We reached Darwin after almost 3 days of a journey. On our last flight – from Sydney to Darwin – we were in the state of diminished consciousness, resulting from extreme fatigue. Chris and Greg – our teenage boys – could fall asleep in any position. Chris treated a nice lady sitting by him as a sleeping pillow and he did not let explain to him to lean his head to the left side, where my shoulder was in a “standby mode”. Our plane neighbor tried several times to hand me Chris's head, but finally, she gave up and fell asleep. That let the last bits of my awareness quickly vaporized from the body of its host and I went in the footsteps of most travelers who, for a long time, have been steadily breathing or already snoring.

I did not set my alarm clock, but sudden air turbulences brutally woke me up. I looked out the window, took out my watch – called iPhone – and was totally surprised. I was sleeping almost for two hours, but the landscape outside the window has not changed at all – maybe just one or two tones of color. As far as I could see there was only one landscape – a desert. It was a little bit of white, mostly red with probably some roads which – from this height – looked like lines. For two hours, meaning for about 1800km, nothing has changed. And my surprise was even greater when for the next two hours nothing has changed neither. I think that was the moment I finally comprehended the truth about Australia. In its major part, Australia is a DESERT. The tempting commercials showing a rich and colorful Australia are in fact showing what is beyond its land borders or on its rims. They show sunny beaches and the ocean, where the beautiful coral reef reigns.

In our holiday's plans we apparently had a bullet point under the title “getting to the places in which they make commercials about Australia” but at this moment, we were precisely 10 km above the arid and inhospitable land I've ever seen.

After a four-hour flight over the desert areas of Australia, the plane captain finally announced that we were approaching Darwin … All guidebooks warned us that this city was quite dull and expensive, so we did not have a high motivation to start our adventure by exploring Darwin. Instead, we chose the option that I would recommend to all families who prefer holidays of close-to-nature style. We rented a 4WD car and went to Litchfield National Park, where we had a holiday home booked for three nights.

As tourists going to Australia cannot bring in any food, we had to do some shopping at the grocery store on the way to Litchfield. That proved to be more difficult than we expected because we could not spot anything which would resemble at least the shape of the grocery store. After an hour of food store searching, we began to picture that for the first breakfast we will have nothing more than a tap water. Fortunately, this vision did not come true, as finally, we spotted the “Woodworth” store. When you are hungry, you tend to buy more than you really need. That probably happened to us, as we left there nearly three hundred dollars, but in return, our eating bag began to have nice rounded shape, clearly communicating that tomorrow's breakfast will be “yummy”…

In August, in Australia the days are quite short – it gets dark before 19.00. The car rental company warned us not to drive a car when it is dark. Unfortunately, the sun did not want to wait till Walking Stones would reach its camping site and it hid behind the horizon about an hour too early … Fortunately, we reached our destination without any unexpected encounters with animals. The wild animals seemed to know that this particular today they should stay away from the highway because the Walking Stones family is learning how to drive on the left side of the road…